Tuition Free College – What’s the Best Kept Secret in Education?

For many prospective college students, tuition can be a make-or-break factor in the final decision. What if there were a tuition free college? Thankfully, there are many schools around the world that do just that.

A tuition free college is able to sustain itself through government subsidiaries, thus dropping the tuition cost.

Nevertheless, there are still some costs involved in attending a tuition free university, such as room & board, books, etc. This can be covered in most cases, as many tuition free college

allow students to work while in school.

A lot of tuition free college are in Europe, where this educational scheme has a long and successful history.One example of a tuition free college is the Jonkoping International Business School. Located in Sweden, the Jonkoping International Business School is an urban university that offers degrees in informatics, economics, business administration, commercial law, and political science. Bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees are offered, and most of the classes are in English. The school is relatively small, with a total enrollment of about 2000 students, of which 25% are international students.

Just like the Jonkoping International Business School, many other tuition free college have strong English support due to the extensive number of international students. Not all of these academic establishments focus on business though. There is a wide range of degrees and programs offered around the world, including computer science, IT, and engineering degrees.

In addition, such high programs such as medical school are offered. In order to participate in a free study abroad, be aware that a list of prerequisites awaits you. First things first, any prospective student needs to contact the embassy of the host country to acquire a student visa. Secondly, make sure to check with the university regarding any entry exams or grade requirements. All in all, the ambition of attending college shouldn’t be hampered with tuition, and in the case of the many tuition free universities around the world, it doesn’t have to be.

Software Engineering Higher Education Options

Gaining an education in software engineering can be done by enrolling in an accredited school or college. Students who wish to enter the field of computer education can do so by obtaining a degree. Higher education allows students to complete the degree program needed to gain the skills and knowledge needed to enter into a career. Students can train for an associate’s, bachelors, masters, and doctorates level degree. There are numerous things that one should know before enrolling in an accredited software engineering program.

  1. Software engineers are trained to carry out a variety of tasks including modifying, implementing, testing, and designing computers and computer related software. This includes business applications, computer games, operating systems, and much more. The field of software engineering allows students to work as applications engineers, systems engineers, and other professionals. Applications engineers are construct and maintain general applications for businesses and organizations. Systems engineers are trained to coordinate the maintenance and construction of computer systems.
  2. Students will be able to pursue a number of careers with an accredited degree. The ability to train to become computer programmers, systems and applications engineers, and more is available. The type of career will depend on the level of degree obtained. Students can earn an associates degree in as little as two years. A bachelor’s degree program will take around four years to complete. Students who wish to pursue a masters or doctorates degree can expect to spend an additional two to four years on study.
  3. Coursework will vary by school or college and level of degree desired and obtained by each student. Students can expect to study a variety of course subjects related to the field of computer engineering. Curriculum may cover subjects such as programming, program development, troubleshooting, computer networks, information technology, and much more. Accredited educational training programs allow students to receive a higher education by teaching a number of courses related to each individual’s desired career.
  4. With a number of computer engineering specialists and professionals in the workforce students need to gain all the skills and knowledge possible in order to find employment. The number of openings is expected to increase for occupations and careers in this field. The type of career and degree desired will also help decide how much income the students can make. According to the Bureau of labor Statistics professionals in this field can make between $50,000 and $135,000 annually based on their level of degree and experience.
  5. Continuing education courses are available for those looking to improve their skills in their career. Accredited higher education programs allow students to earn certificates in specific areas of the field in order to enhance knowledge.

Students can gain the training they need to succeed by enrolling in an accredited school or college. Agencies like the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology ( www.abet.org ) is approved to fully accredit programs that meet certain criteria. With an accredited training program students will gain the education they deserve. Students can research programs and start the path to a new career by requesting more information.

DISCLAIMER: Above is a GENERIC OUTLINE and may or may not depict precise methods, courses and/or focuses related to ANY ONE specific school(s) that may or may not be advertised at PETAP.org.

Copyright 2010 – All rights reserved by PETAP.org.

Employers Value Candidates Who Study Abroad

Penn State, University of Notre Dame, University of Kentucky and Pacific Lutheran University participated in a recent study, which shows employers find value in Study Abroad when evaluating job search candidates. “In general, Study Abroad was looked upon favorably,” said Robert Domingo, a research associate at Penn State in an interview with The Daily Collegian. In the same survey, to which 352 employers responded, having the preferred academic major was ranked most desirable by employers and completing a major or minor in a foreign language was ranked second. Study abroad was ranked third.

In a more recent study of 119 employers conducted by the Career Center at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 59% of respondents said that Study Abroad or other international experience, other than an internship, would be very valuable or somewhat valuable in an individual’s career later on with their organization.

Study Abroad programs are becoming increasingly attractive as more and more college students seek meaningful ways to spend college breaks or explore true diversity of cultures. Additionally, as students return and share their positive experiences, others sign up to head overseas as well.

Two great resources for students considering studying overseas are StudyAbroad.com and Semester at Sea.

StudyAbroad.com is a comprehensive online source of information about educational opportunities for high school students, college students or graduate students wanting to study in other countries. It includes information on summer programs, internships, service learning programs and overseas volunteer opportunities. The information is easy to follow and is sorted by subject, country or city.

Semester at Sea, run by the Institute for Shipboard Education, gets academic sponsorship from the University of Virginia where students can apply for credit for the 2007 summer trip. This trip will have students traversing the Western coast of Central America and South America. Stops this summer will include Chile, Peru, Costa Rica and Nicaragua. Financial aid is available to help students cover the $8000+ cost of the just over 2 month journey onboard the floating university. The Fall 2007 trip is scheduled for stops in Japan, Thailand, China and India while Puerto Rico, Brazil, South Africa and Mauritius are on tap for the Spring 2008 journey.

No study abroad program is without risk and students and parents should do all the required due diligence to make sure these experiences do not end with less than positive results. Some general advice to be safe on a study abroad experience are as follows and include some tips from the University of Chicago’s Study Abroad program:

1. Be alert at all times. Remember you are in unfamiliar surroundings

2. Trust your instincts

3. Be cautious and protective with your cash

4. Observe political gatherings from a distance

5. Learn where the nearest police station, hospital and embassy is located

6. Stay sober and away from drugs and alcohol. This is not the time to lose focus

7. Be particularly alert while on public transportation and in public places

8. Be mindful of new friendships that develop too quickly

9. Make copies of all your important papers. Keep a set of copies with you as well as leave one at home.

10. Be inconspicuous and try to blend in as much as possible. Avoid being the noisy tourist

11. Check in often with home. Have somewhat of a routine so that folks at home will know if you are off schedule.

A Bondage of Education

From a very early age I can remember my parents, teachers, and friends discussing this idea of education. What it is, what it should be, what it could be, but more importantly how I would use it to “further” my life. I had this notion that education was going to school, memorizing what the teacher said, applying it to a test, and repeating the routine for the next twelve years. The term “career ready” is not only what gave me the desire to have straight A’s in high school, but what brought me to a university. I came with hope to finally break away from the restraint that I believed was only a result of what a high school education could do to an individual’s mind, but quickly came to realize that a “liberal education” from college was not that different. Liberal education was designed to free individuals from the bonds that society placed upon them, but present-day education is what holds those bonds together.

I will never forget the first time I failed a test. It was in fifth with one of my favorite teachers. I remember receiving the test back with a zero on the front and instantly covering the test up so no one could not see the sign of failure. The teacher must have seen my shock because I was told to stay after class. She explained to me how I had made a 100 but I did not “take the test right” which is what resulted in the zero. From then on, I developed what college students call “test anxiety.” I worked to follow directions, to be structured, and to never ask a question that could possibly be wrong. I made straight A’s, participated in school organizations, was president of my class, and lived to fill the resume that would be sent to potential colleges. I did what students are expected to do. When I came to college I was excited because I could finally learn outside the perimeters of standardized tests. What I did not expect was to hear phrases from professors such as, “don’t worry this will not be on the test,” or having to spend thirty minutes of class listening to students ask how many questions will be on the exam. Teachers from my high school always told us, “college will not be like this, so enjoy it while you can,” but it was all the same. Listen, take notes, memorize, take test, repeat.

I began to realize that maybe this was what education was intended to be. A system that engrains students with the idea that to conform and restrain one’s mind to standardization is what makes us “successful.” David Brooks discusses how college students are “goal-orientated… a means for self-improvement, resume-building, and enrichment. College is just one step on the continual stairway of advancement and they are always aware that they must get to the next step.” Students go through elementary, junior high, high school, and now even universities not to “free our minds” or truly educating ourselves, but to climb the ladder of social order. One can relate education to Plato’s cave allegory, “they are in it from childhood with their legs and necks in bonds so that they are fixed, seeing only in front of them unable because of the bond to turn their heads.” This system of education that parents, professors, politicians, employers, and even students talk so highly about is not about producing the world’s next great minds, it is about producing the world’s next source of capital. Society has taken a liberal education and twisted it to where it will fit students into its workplace.

Everyone says that your first semester of college is the hardest. You move away from home, meet new people, and are thrown into a whole new environment. I knew it would be tough, but never thought I would be the student that curled onto her dorm room rug and cried over a seventy-eight on a couple of tests. I had made back-to-back “failing grades” in my mind and had the mindset that I could never recover. What could I accomplish without a 4.0 GPA and four years on the Deans List? To make matters worse, I received a zero for a homework assignment. Believing that there must have been something wrong, I made my way to my TAs office hours where he proceeded to tell me that I did great on the assignment but had to give me a zero based on a small technicality. That is when I had the realization that a modern-day college education has nothing to do with a liberal education. From then on, every test I would take and grade that followed would no longer determine how I would go about learning. I decided that in order to receive a true liberal education I had to throw away every concept of what I thought education was. In Plato’s book I was reminded that “education is not what the professions of certain men assert it to be” and when I decided to make my way out of ‘the cave’ of education I was thankful for the realization that I had broken the bonds that society tried so hard to place tightly around me. Leo Strauss said that a “liberal education supplies us with experience in things beautiful,” and that is when an individual is truly free.

I sometimes think about where I would be if I had the mindset that I do now about education when I received that zero if fifth grade. Would I have waved it in the air as a badge of pride representing how I refused to conform to the institution instead of hiding it from my friends in shame or would I had done it all the same? A true liberal education is what enables individuals to achieve, admire, and model greatness. So, when I hear a professor repeat the phrase “don’t worry, this won’t be on the test,” a part of me wonders if even they have given up on helping break the bonds placed upon us.

Renaissance Science and Education’s Cult of Fear

Maria Montessori, the molecular biologist Sir C P Snow and the engineer Buckminster Fuller, warned that modern science must be reunited with the Classical Greek life science Humanities in order to prevent the destruction of civilization. They stressed that the obstacle preventing this was an inadequate understanding of the second law of thermodynamics. Fuller balanced that law with his synergetic biological energy derived from the Classical Greek world view. Fullerene fractal logic has now been used to establish a new life science in defiance of the present fixed world view. Fuller considered that the catalyst for avoiding oblivion would be via the Arts. It can be argued that the Western educational system is actually preventing the new balanced understanding of the second law, which Montessori referred to as the greed energy law, by employing a culture of fear, in particular concerning the second law of thermodynamics.

Firstly, the existence of a more general culture of fear within the Australian educational system is now a common knowledge concept. Leading up to the June, 2010, removal of the Australian Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, allegations of organized greed within the educational system concerning billions of dollars allocated for the construction of school buildings were continually reported by the national newspaper, The Australian. On June 30th a front page story reported that a 14 million dollar task force established to investigate the issue was unlikely to hear complaints about the schools stimulus program from 110 NSW principals. The investigation team could not offer those principals “anonymity” and they were consequently silenced by a “culture of fear”, emanating from the NSW Education department.

Secondly, a far more serious aspect of coercion within the Australian educational system was alluded to within a Higher Education article published by The Australian on March 8th 2006, entitled ‘Muzzling of Science’, written by Professor Julian Cribb, Editor of the R&D REVIEW at the University of Technology in Sydney. Professor Cribb wrote “Publish or perish used to be the mantra by which the researcher lived or died. Today, according to an increasing number of eminent scientists in unpopular fields, Australian researchers can do both”. He defined ‘unpopular’ as “any of those fields of science liable to produce evidence unsettling to the fixed world-view held by governments, business, special interest lobbies or that most anonymous and unaccountable of research controllers, the stakeholders”. Professor Cribb explained how reprisals were being enforced, noting that once enacted, it is hard in science to find another job that isn’t in a taxi.

The second complaint about a culture of fear within the Australian educational system is directly relevant to the second law of thermodynamics because that law entirely governs the fixed world view controlling university education in Australia. In 1996 the Australian government was taken to task in an Open Letter to the United Nations Secretariat for committing crimes against humanity because of that fact. A several year peer review investigation by the United Nations University Millennium Project, Australasian Node, resulted in a official endorsement of that complaint on September 5th, 2006.

The expenditure of 14 million dollars in Australia to investigate general greed allegations within the educational system is a paltry figure compared to the tens of millions of pounds sterling spent in England attempting to discover new technologies from Sir Isaac Newton’s unpublished more profound physics principles to balance the mechanical description of the universe. Newton’s balanced world view was in defiance of the present fixed world view. Classification of the balancing physics principles as a criminal heresy by some people can be considered as part of the fear culture that will not tolerate challenges to the present fixed world view, which is governed by what Montessori called the greed energy law.

The growing unsettling evidence supporting numerous challenges to the fixed world view’s understanding of the second law of thermodynamics can be considered to represent an attempt to bridge Sir C P Snow’s widening culture gap between modern entropic science and the negentropic life science of the Classical Greek Humanities. From the evidence presented within this article we might well consider Buckminster Fuller’s consideration justifiable, that it will be up to the artistic creative thinkers of the world to prevent

the unbalanced second law bringing about the destruction of civilization.

Copyright (c) Robert Pope 2010